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Autistic People of Color are Right Here!

Update (August 2016)

Thank you for your patience as we finalize this anthology. As you know, we intended to publish this April; however, we have run into a number of production delays, which have also been affected by unfortunate circumstances in the personal lives of many of us on the project team, including me. Right now, we are finalizing the formatting and aspects of files necessary for publication before sending to the printer. We currently plan to have the paperback and ebook versions available by the end of August or early September 2016, though it is possible that current delays could extend through the end of September. Stay tuned for details!

Lydia X. Z. Brown
Lead Editor

Update (2 April 2016)

Thank you so much for your support and enthusiastic interest in All the Weight of Our Dreams (the anthology by autistic people of color)! We planned to have the anthology available for purchase as an ebook and in print today, but right now, we're actually making final adjustments to the manuscript to ensure it will be in the best form possible. Our updated ETA is that the anthology will be available to the public by the end of April (and hopefully very, very soon). For updates, keep checking this website.

Lydia, E., and Morénike

We matter. We invite you to support us in amplifying the voices of autistic people of color.

For those of us who are autistic and racialized, we often struggle to find representation in mass media, academic work about autism or race, and the activist and advocacy movements that focus on autism, neurodiversity, disability rights, or racial justice. Most autism and autistic organizations, publications about autism, and broader neurodiversity campaigns are predominantly white. Yet disabled Black and Brown students are most likely to be impacted by the school to prison pipeline; the vast majority of U.S. prisoners are disabled and Black or Brown; racialized people are a global majority (which means that autistic people of color far outnumber white autistic people in the world); and the combined impact of race and disability severely increase likelihood for hate crimes, police violence, all other forms of abuse, and repeated retraumatization.

Our stories matter and must be told. We hope that this collection will not only speak sharply against our constant erasure and invisibility as (at least) doubly impacted, but will also provide solace and familiarity for our own out there waiting for stories like theirs to be told.


The Anthology

What is this?

All the Weight of Our Dreams: On Living Racialized Autism

In summer 2014, we announced a new project to compile the first ever anthology of art and writings by autistics of color about our lives, our experiences, our histories, our communities, our struggles, our passions, and our resilience. Our stories deserve to be told both for us and for future generations that will come after us. They are stories of segregation in education; police brutality; families of birth, adoption, and choosing; ableism connected to racism; finding community, making home, survival, and resilience. They are stories of being autistic in a neurotypical world and stories of being racialized in a white-dominant world. Now, we are ready to shake up some foundations.

The Project Team

Who are we?

Project Leads

Lydia X. Z. Brown
E. Ashkenazy
Morénike Giwa Onaiwu

The Autism Womens Network

The Autism Women’s Network is dedicated to building a supportive community for Autistic women of all ages, our families, friends and allies. AWN is committed to recognizing and celebrating diversity and the many intersectional experiences of Autistic women. AWN welcomes all women, supporters of women, those who have at one time identified as women and non binary gender variant individuals. AWN recognizes and affirms the gender identity of each individual.

Learn more about us

The Movers and Shakers

Whose work?

Artists, Bloggers, Writers

All the Weight of Our Dreams features work from over sixty contributors from seven different countries.

The collection features new and classic work from activists and community leaders like Kassiane Sibley, N.I. Nicholson, Timotheus Gordon Jr., Finn Gardiner, and Emma Rosenthal, alongside desperately needed work from newer voices like kiran foster, Emily Pate, Lucas Vizeu, Jennifer Msumba, and Daniel Obejas.

We are also proud to highlight fantastic fiction and poetry from writers like Bijhan Valibeigi, Angel A. McCorkle, Emily Pate, Helene Fischer, Kaijaii Gomez Wick, and Lee Lyubov, among many others!

Meet our contributors

Support Our Work

You can amplify the voices of autistic people of color, too.

By the end of Summer 2016, All the Weight of Our Dreams will be available for purchase in paperback and ebook formats.

You can also donate to the Autism Women's Network to fund efforts to disseminate the anthology widely to community and college libraries, and support further projects led by and for autistic people of color. (For all donations, send AWN a note indicating the purpose of the donation.)

Donate to AWN

Get to know us

Around the Web

All the Weight of Our Dreams features work from over 60 vital voices, but our work (by writers and artists already included in the collection as well as many not in this inaugural volume) exists in many spaces.

Here is just a small selection of the phenomenal work we're doing:

Talila A. Lewis
Timotheus J. Gordon
(Pharaoh Inkabuss)
Finn Gardiner, Manuel Díaz,
& Lydia X. Z. Brown
Honoring Arnaldo Rios-Soto & Charles Kinsey: Achieving Liberation Through Disability Solidarity #BlackDisabledLivesMatter vs #AllDisabledLivesMatter Charles Kinsey's Story Is About Race. It's Also About Ableism.
Bridget Liang Cyrée Jarelle Johnson N.I. (Ian) Nicholson
Image of Bridget cuddling a cat. Text overlay says, When Is Justice Just? Disease Is Not A Metaphor The Only Way Out Is Through: Or a Bit of the Story Behind Time Travel in a Closet
Sara María Acevedo Anita Cameron Michón Neal
Image of Sara wearing shirt that says, My other disability is a bad attitude. Text overlay says, Neuroqueering Composition: Sensual Reflections on the Inconclusive Life of Thoughts Image of Anita handcuffing herself to a fence in protest. Text overlay says, Anita Cameron Discusses Race, Disability, Sexuality and Being a Woman Out & Proud Black Genderqueer Polyamorous Pansexual
Elly Wong Malisha Dewalt Jennifer Msumba
Beating the Odds Painting of Malisha holding a cat. Text overlay says, Misery Is Not A Virtue The Day I Spoke Up